I don’t need a day to remember my father

I don’t need a day to remember my father
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I don’t need a day to remember my father

George John Hanania was a great guy and a phenomenal father, for the 16 years that I knew him. My dad fled the Holy Land in 1926 to get away from the hatred that consumed both Arabs and Jews. An older brother Joseph drowned in the Jerusalem Quarry (Migharat al-Kitan, or “Cotton Cave”) when no one would swim out to save him. The Palestine Police report said Jews wouldn’t help because they thought he was an Arab, Christians wouldn’t help because they thought he was Muslim and Muslims wouldn’t help because they thought he was Jewish. But after arriving in Chicago, he worked hard to build a life that would make any American proud

By Ray Hanania

My dad was a great guy. It’s never too late to celebrate your father. I remember a strong person who never complained to anyone and took it on the chin and moved on. He didn’t blame others, but just pushed forward.

My dad, George, lived at a time when things were far better than they are today, in a society that had more to celebrate than to mourn.

Dad worked hard. He would walk to the bus on 87th and Jeffrey, pay 25 cents and take the bus to work downtown, first for Sinclair Oil Company, where he was laid off before he could qualify for his pension, and then later for Northern Trust Bank, where he was laid-off because he was “too old.” I remember waiting for the bus to arrive and dad would get off at Calumet Park, which used to be a park for everyone before it was named for just some; he would be wearing his long dark camel hair coat and dark fedora. He actually carried a “brief case.”

Brothers Edward Hanania, Khamis Hanania, George Hanania and Farid Hanania while George was serving in the U.S. Army in the O.S.S. during World War II. Their other brother Moses was overseas in the U.S. Navy on a battleship. Photo courtesy of Ray Hanania

Brothers Edward Hanania, Khamis Hanania, George Hanania and Farid Hanania while George was serving in the U.S. Army in the O.S.S. during World War II. Their other brother Moses was overseas in the U.S. Navy on a battleship. Photo courtesy of Ray Hanania

He loved this country. Immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this legal immigrant and his legal immigrant brother enlisted in the Military and fought the Nazis without a complaint. It took a lot to become a citizen. But dad did the work. He learned English perfectly. He waited patiently for his citizenship papers. He stood proudly to swear the Citizenship Oath. The hard work was worth it all, just to call yourself an American!

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Yes, dad smoked. Camel unfiltered cigarettes. One pack a day. Humphrey Bogart smoked them but dad smoked them to survive the war. And “More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette,” the advertisements boasted.

Dad respected everyone, even though not everyone always respected him. Being Arab American made his life challenging in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. He celebrated his heritage in a community that at one time was proud to be Arab, but that today has deteriorated into extremist religious fanaticism.

Dad didn’t hate anyone. We lived in a neighborhood where we were the outsiders. We understood what it was like to be stared at because of the dark color of our skin – olive was dark. Dad lived at a time when people lived among their own and tried to respect everyone else. We lived in an Arab-Jewish neighborhood when Arabs and Jews actually got along. There was the Polish neighborhood. The Greek neighborhood. The Spanish neighborhood. The Black neighborhood. The Asian neighborhood. There was some overlap, but rarely a problem. Apologies were accepted because “everyone makes mistakes.” Cassius Clay (Mohammed Ali) shopped at our grocery store where I worked as a bagger — he would point at me and pick me to carry his grocery bags out to his Car, and then give me a dollar.

Arab Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter in America, about 1957. Photo courtesy of Ray Hanania

Arab Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter in America, about 1957. Photo courtesy of Ray Hanania

Dad never yelled at the TV set. He lived at a time when the mainstream major news media was a source of information, not a source of lies, distortions and bias. When Ed Sullivan would come on TV and introduce new talent, we would all be sitting quietly and attentively in front of the little Black and White TV set. We lived in a time when there were words and expletives that could not be said out loud because the words were so disrespectful and demeaning, not just to someone else, but to yourself.

He lived at a time when the goal was to get an education, find a good job, buy a home and raise a family to abide by the laws, respect your neighbors and never say anything bad about anyone else.

We actually sat down not just on Sundays but every night to enjoy a family meal together. “Family” had meaning. Dad lived at a time when families would actually come together and enjoy a big family meal together celebrating their lives, not checking up on each other on Facebook. You actually had to put effort into maintaining your relationship with your relatives, writing letters, taking pictures that took days to process and then share with your relatives.

Dad lived at a time when the telephone was a nuisance, not an excuse to waste time. TV was a magnet to bring families together, not a place for shock and awe.

Despite working more than 40 hours every week, leaving at 6 am and returning at 7 pm, Dad found time to make his home look great. He mowed the lawn with a push mower. He planted flowers with my mom. They were always holding hands, hugging and kissing. They worked hard during the day and on th eweekends worked hard to keep their home clean. There was a pride in looking good.

We didn’t go on cruises or beach vacations. We did road trips through America, collecting little decals and postcards from each state. There was nothing like stopping in Nebraska to visit Fort Cody or get your picture on Dino the giant green Sinclair Dinosaur at a gas station. We slept at Motels and enjoyed the American landscape.

My dad was more than just a person. He was a great lifestyle and role model, one this country has to struggle hard these days to find.

(Ray Hanania is an award winning columnist and former Chicago City Hall reporter (1976-1992). He writes a syndicated column on Chicagoland politics and hosts a weekly podcast called “Ray Hanania on Politics” that is available on all podcast platforms. His personal website is www.Hanania.com. Email him at rghanania@gmail.com.)

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Ray Hanania

Ray Hanania is an award winning political and humor columnist who analyzes American and Middle East politics, and life in general. He is an author of several books.

"I write about three topics, the Middle East, politics and life in general. I often take my life experiences and offer them in an entertaining way to readers, and I take on the toughest topics like the Israel-Palestine conflict and don't pull any punches about what I feel is fair. But, my priority is always about writing the good story."

Hanania covered Chicago Politics and Chicago City Hall from 1976 through 1992. Hanania began writing in 1975 when he published The Middle Eastern Voice newspaper in Chicago (1975-1977). He later published “The National Arab American Times” newspaper which was distributed through 12,500 Middle East food stores in 48 American States (2004-2007).

Hanania writes weekly columns on Middle East and American Arab issues for the Arab News in Saudi Arabia at www.ArabNews.com, and at www.TheArabDailyNews.com, www.TheDailyHookah.com and at SuburbanChicagoland.com. He has also published weekly columns in the Jerusalem Post newspaper, YNetNews.com, Newsday Newspaper in New York, the Orlando Sentinel Newspapers, and the Arlington Heights Daily Herald.

Palestinian, American Arab and Christian, Hanania’s parents originate from Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

Hanania is the recipient of four (4) Chicago Headline Club “Peter Lisagor Awards” for Column writing. In November 2006, he was named “Best Ethnic American Columnist” by the New American Media. In 2009, Hanania received the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi Award for Writing from the Society of Professional Journalists. He is the recipient of the MT Mehdi Courage in Journalism Award. He was honored for his writing skills with two (2) Chicago Stick-o-Type awards from the Chicago Newspaper Guild. In 1990, Hanania was nominated by the Chicago Sun-Times editors for a Pulitzer Prize for his four-part series on the Palestinian Intifada.

His writings have also been honored by two national Awards from ADC for his writing, and from the National Arab American Journalists Association.

The managing editor of Suburban Chicagoland Online News website www.SuburbanChicagoland.com, Hanania's columns also appear in the Southwest News Newspaper Group of 8 newspapers.

Click here to send Ray Hanania and email.

His Facebook Page is Facebook.com/rghanania

Visit this link to read Ray's column archive at the ArabNews,com ArabNews.com/taxonomy/term/10906
Ray Hanania

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